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ll giardino dei Finzi Contini

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Giorgio Bassani's acclaimed novel of unreuited love and the plight of the Italian Jews on the brink of World War II has become a classic of modern Italian literature Made into an Academy Award winning film in 1970 The Garden of the Finzi Continis is a richly evocative and nostalgic depiction of prewar Italy The narrator a young middle class Jew in the It. Edited 6719 see last section45 stars for me no less than for her the memory of things was much important than the possession of them and in comparison with that memory all possession in itself seemed just disappointing delusive flat insufficientThe way I longed for the present to become the past at once so that I could love it and gaze fondly at it any timeIt was our vice this looking backward as we went aheadtranslated by William WeaverThe inner flap of this edition mentions Marcel Proust but even without that I'm sure I would've thought of him not only with the above passage but with the unnamed narrator's love for the tennis playing Micòl at an age when love euals jealousy a love without the understanding that the insecurities and accusations that arise from the lesser emotion will not endear you to the beloved Though she's seen through the narrator's rear view mirror Micòl is no Proustian Albertine For only one thing Micòl's family not the narrator's is the one with money; but importantly unlike Albertine Micòl is not a concept but a character who speaks her mind acts and reacts though perhaps the two differences are not unrelated It is Ferrara though with its city walls and ducal gardens that is the main character a city as insular as Micòl's familyWe know from the beginning that this Jewish family living in Fascist Italy in the late 1930s is doomed They continue to live as they always do ignoring a certain future even making plans to enlarge a tennis court that their non Jewish friends are forbidden to play on Political thought is represented in the character of their Communist friend the forward thinking Malnate but even he cannot escape The familiarity of the novel's tone nagged at me though I can't put my finger on why it felt that way and I'm not thinking of Proust now Most likely that feeling came from other backwards looking novels of love and loss I've read that have become an amorphous mass in my so called memory bank but that doesn't mean this one isn't a special oneBecause of events listed in the author's biography on the book jacket I assumed this novel was semi autobiographical; but it was only today after paging to the front of the book before writing this review that I noticed the dedication To MicòlI read the first translated into English edition and encountered a couple of disconcerting glaringly obvious misplaced modifiers I trust those were corrected in later editionsRereadIn Within the Walls and The Gold Rimmed Spectacles the works that come before this novel in this edition Bassani's narrator seems to be commenting on community members staying purposely unaware not open to what is about to happen With my second read of The Garden of the Finzi Continis I find Bassani's narrator also not facing up to reality choosing to be in a state of dreaming of the past in lieu of facing the present Rereading this review I saw that I marked the same passage different translations during my two reads see the top of the page to compare that to thisShe could sense it very clearly for me no less than for her the past counted far than the present remembering something far than possessing it Compared to memory every possession can only ever seem disappointing banal inadeuateShe understood me so well My anxiety that the present immediately turned into the past so that I could love it and dream about it at leisure was just like hers was identical It was our vice this to go forward with our heads forever turned backtranslated by Jamie McKendrickI reread the novel in this edition Drink to Yesterday (Tommy Hambledon, young middle class Jew in the It. Edited 6719 see last section45 stars for me no less than for her the memory of things was much important than the possession of them and in comparison with that memory all possession in itself seemed just disappointing delusive flat insufficientThe way I longed for the present to become the past at once so that I could love it and gaze fondly at it any timeIt was our vice this looking backward as we went aheadtranslated by William WeaverThe inner flap of this edition mentions Marcel Proust but even without that I'm sure I would've thought of him not only with the above passage but with the unnamed narrator's love for the tennis playing Micòl at an age when love euals jealousy a love without the understanding that the insecurities and accusations that arise from the lesser emotion will not endear The Second Wave: The Makanza Series Book 0 (English Edition) you to the beloved Though she's seen through the narrator's rear view mirror Micòl is no Proustian Albertine For only one thing Micòl's family not the narrator's is the one with money; but importantly unlike Albertine Micòl is not a concept but a character who speaks her mind acts and reacts though perhaps the two differences are not unrelated It is Ferrara though with its city walls and ducal gardens that is the main character a city as insular as Micòl's familyWe know from the beginning that this Jewish family living in Fascist Italy in the late 1930s is doomed They continue to live as they always do ignoring a certain future even making plans to enlarge a tennis court that their non Jewish friends are forbidden to play on Political thought is represented in the character of their Communist friend the forward thinking Malnate but even he cannot escape The familiarity of the novel's tone nagged at me though I can't put my finger on why it felt that way and I'm not thinking of Proust now Most likely that feeling came from other backwards looking novels of love and loss I've read that have become an amorphous mass in my so called memory bank but that doesn't mean this one isn't a special oneBecause of events listed in the author's biography on the book jacket I assumed this novel was semi autobiographical; but it was only today after paging to the front of the book before writing this review that I noticed the dedication To MicòlI read the first translated into English edition and encountered a couple of disconcerting glaringly obvious misplaced modifiers I trust those were corrected in later editionsRereadIn Within the Walls and The Gold Rimmed Spectacles the works that come before this novel in this edition Bassani's narrator seems to be commenting on community members staying purposely unaware not open to what is about to happen With my second read of The Garden of the Finzi Continis I find Bassani's narrator also not facing up to reality choosing to be in a state of dreaming of the past in lieu of facing the present Rereading this review I saw that I marked the same passage different translations during my two reads see the top of the page to compare that to thisShe could sense it very clearly for me no less than for her the past counted far than the present remembering something far than possessing it Compared to memory every possession can only ever seem disappointing banal inadeuateShe understood me so well My anxiety that the present immediately turned into the past so that I could love it and dream about it at leisure was just like hers was identical It was our vice this to go forward with our heads forever turned backtranslated by Jamie McKendrickI reread the novel in this edition

characters ☆ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ´ Giorgio Bassani

Continis becomes a sort of idyllic sanctuary in an increasingly brutal world Years later after the war the narrator returns in memory to his doomed relationship with the lovely Micol and to the predicament that faced all the Ferrarese Jews in this unforgettably wrenching portrait of a community about to be destroyed by the world outside the garden walls. What impossible people they were he'd say What a strange absurd tangle of incurable contradictions they represented 'socially' If The Gold Rimmed Spectacles conflated the tragedy of Dr Fadigati with the announcements of Mussolini's Racial Laws then this book turns the pages back to our unnamed narrator's boyhood and adolescence and parallels his painful first love with the increasing power of Italy's fascist regime We know from the outset that the Jewish Finzi Continis don't survive the Holocaust and the book positions story telling as an act of memorialisation creating a monumental sepulchre for people whose fate remains unknown who disappeared beneath the sheer incomprehensible numbers of the killed and unburiedIt would be so easy then to sentimentalise this story and it's a marker of Bassani's stature as a novelist that he doesn't do this On one hand the Finzi Continis are enchanting and charming not least Micol the girl with whom the narrator becomes obsessed Their family linguistics known as 'Finzi Continish' reminded me of the Mitfords who also had an internal language that bound them Yet on the other again perhaps like the Mitfords there are darker elements attached to the family they are proud of their wealth arrogant and deliberately isolate themselves from Ferrara with their walled house and gardens and the narrator comments on their 'aristocratic subterranean persistent anti Semitism' It's this nuanced approach to the complexities of personality and politics that make this book so outstandingThe eponymous garden itself becomes a layered place both a golden lost Eden from which the inhabitants are exiled; but also a site of separation and division Our narrator first meets Micol when she stands on a ladder leaning over the wall which stands between them and it's years before he manages to actually cross that barrier And even once he does he is forced to put himself outside it again the proximity it creates to his idol who cannot be possessed becomes too overwhelming too claustrophobic too dangerous Inevitably the walls around the Finzi Contini house echo the city walls of Ferrara herself walls create prisons as well as sanctuaries they divide communities even while they might create boundaries that theoretically keep those inside safe; they isolate as well as protect The chronology of this book is far looser than the previous volumes there's ten years between the narrator's first meeting with Micol and his invitation to a tennis party The book ends just before the outbreak of war but the story is told from the vantage point of 1957 as the narrator recuperates in tender detail his lost youth and a family whose isolationism not only couldn't protect them but might have actively contributed to their fate Is withdrawal from the world an act of arrogant pride and short sighted complicity is a uestions which haunts this book as not even Giampiero Malnate's passionate communism can rouse the family to the realities and directons of fascismCharacters we've met in the earlier stories play a role once so that the previous books form a kind of reader's memory to parallel the narrator's Dr Fadigati and his tragic fate the staunch and courageous integrity of the socialist Clelia Trotti form a background to this tale Ultimately this feels like a loss of innocence story which traces the painful gaining of knowledge of the ravages of love and the worst excesses of humanity let loose via fascism Jaxon (Kings of Denver years before he manages to actually cross that barrier And even once he does he is forced to put himself outside it again the proximity it creates to his idol who cannot be possessed becomes too overwhelming too claustrophobic too dangerous Inevitably the walls around the Finzi Contini house echo the city walls of Ferrara herself walls create prisons as well as sanctuaries they divide communities even while they might create boundaries that theoretically keep those inside safe; they isolate as well as protect The chronology of this book is far looser than the previous volumes there's ten Drink to Yesterday (Tommy Hambledon, years between the narrator's first meeting with Micol and his invitation to a tennis party The book ends just before the outbreak of war but the story is told from the vantage point of 1957 as the narrator recuperates in tender detail his lost The Second Wave: The Makanza Series Book 0 (English Edition) youth and a family whose isolationism not only couldn't protect them but might have actively contributed to their fate Is withdrawal from the world an act of arrogant pride and short sighted complicity is a uestions which haunts this book as not even Giampiero Malnate's passionate communism can rouse the family to the realities and directons of fascismCharacters we've met in the earlier stories play a role once so that the previous books form a kind of reader's memory to parallel the narrator's Dr Fadigati and his tragic fate the staunch and courageous integrity of the socialist Clelia Trotti form a background to this tale Ultimately this feels like a loss of innocence story which traces the painful gaining of knowledge of the ravages of love and the worst excesses of humanity let loose via fascism

Giorgio Bassani ´ 0 Download

Alian city of Ferrara has long been fascinated from afar by the Finzi Continis a wealthy and aristocratic Jewish family and especially by their charming daughter Micol But it is not until 1938 that he is invited behind the walls of their lavish estate as local Jews begin to gather there to avoid the racial laws of the Fascists and the garden of the Finzi. A historical novel set among an Italian Jewish community in the late 1930s this book has lyrical descriptive passages and a moving elegiac storyline Very enjoyableLike so many of the books I read long before joining GR I would have to read this again to write a review that does it justice It is part of a cycle of novels set in Ferrara and all of the others are now available in the same Penguin Modern Classics series Like another of my favourite books Hopeful Monsters by Nicholas Mosley it transcends the series it is part of and can be read as a self contained novel