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Yuganta The End of an Epoch

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YUGANTA THE END OF AN EPOCH IRAWATI Internet Archive BookReader YUGANTA THE END OF AN EPOCH IRAWATI KARVE Vasundhra INDIA'S MYTHOLOGICAL HISTORY Yuganta The End of an Epoch | Irawati Karve | Yuganta The End of an Epoch Irawati Karve Yuganta studies the principal mythical heroic figures of the Mahabharata from historical anthropological and secular perspectives The usually venerated characters of this ancient Indian epic are here subjected to a rational enuiry that places them in context unravels their hopes and fears and imbues them with wholly human motives thereby Yuganta the end of an epoch HIMANSHU RAI Yuganta the end of an epoch I read the Mahabharata because I like it The Mahabharata is an inexhaustible mine may as well be my own words those who know me well even my students may vouch for it But these words are not mine These are just two of the three things I share with Irawati Karve a celebrated and distinguished anthropologist The third one is exploring the humanity in the Yuganta The End of an Epoch Wikipedia Yuganta The End of an Epoch is a book written by anthropologist Irawati KarveIt is shortly called as Yuganta It is a critical analysis of Mahabharata The book was written in Marathi at first but later it was translated in English by W Norman Brown Yuganta The end of an Epoch by Irawati Karve Anu Yuganta The end of an Epoch by Irawati Karve By Anuradha Goyal May Facebook Twitter Pinterest WhatsApp Email Telegram Yuganta was one book that every Mahabharat lover recommended to me Written almost years back this book Yuganta was out of print for a long time Till I recently found it at a bookstore And what a gem it is The author is a trained yugnta The end of an epoch | flipped through the by Irawati Karve About a the mythical characters of the epic Mahabharata and how human they really were b the various Indian literatures comparative analysis with theRamayana Features Language Simple with explanatory parentheses and footnotes Style Analytical Summary The writer presents a compendium of essays she. Note This is an insanely long review which I did not think much of until I finished and posted So consider yourself warned A short while ago five of us undertook a road trip which was roughly over 3000 KM in all As road trips go it was truly one of the most memorable trips that we had undertaken Since there was also a lot of driving involved at night we resorted to telling stories to keep each other awake Being an incorrigible Mahabharata lover I chose to tell them in detail of the 18 days of the Kurukshetra war and worked backwards to the beginning of the epic What started out as a story telling session kept us all awake with a lot of active discussions back and forth We practically ended up talking almost all of the night On the one hand it helped all of us stay awake and on the other I personally got answers than uestions by the time we were done I wish I had read this before we started the trip This book is new set of glasses which are tinted with a hard and unflinching shade with which Irawati Karwe examines the Mahabharata For ease of summing up some of the major areas the author touches upon are 1The Futility Of Human Effort We struggle all our lives to build name and fame or in corporate lingo to leave our mark on the sands of time Yet what happens eventually Against the unrelenting blow of the wind called time the sands scatter and all that were etched in it are wiped out Yet and of us mortals go through the same notions again and again The Mahabharata has two central characters who depict this to the best Bhishma and Karna Bhishma’s entire life is one that goes to vain in the end He acuired the name and fame by the iron like vow of celibacy he undertook and then on his only aim in life was the sustainment of his clan at the top of the Kshatriya pecking order Forever just pious and morally right Bhishma was said to be the paragon of Kshatriya virtue and yet he never raised a finger against the unruly gang of his great grandsons the Kauravas One thing led to another and against the backdrop of the mighty Kurukshetra war Bhishma watches the clan he tried so hard to sustain getting butchered to the last man He had the gift of choosing his own time of death a terrible gift it turned out to be for he was forced to stay alive watching the bloodbath Irawati Karve shows a whole new group of perspectives which argue that beyond the guise of a colossus Bhishma was a failure as a king warrior and a human beingThere is a lot of lore built around Karna which portrays him as someone who never shied away from helping out others A powerful warrior and someone who was always at a disadvantage right from his childhood at having been abandoned by his mother Karna’s life was a struggle to obtain an identity and thereby be treated with respect by a highly caste oriented society Try as he did he never did attain what he was looking for Popular portrayals of Karna have always maintained the wounded hero image of his and yet in portrayals based on the core text of the Mahabharata Karna is a selfish and entirely self centered man The author does a very detailed inspection of this amazing character to arrive at a most human portrayal of him which I have seen very few later day writers do Drawing a parallel with Bhishma here too was a man who all his life struggled for an ideal and ultimately failed at it2The Women The course of the main story of the Mahabharata is driven inexorably to the calamitous end by the designs of its pivotal female characters Unlike most other tales where women are marginalized presences here the women give new dimensions and meanings to the entire story line of the epic The author assesses the impact and effect of three of the most powerful characters in the epic Gandhari Kunti and DraupadiThe warring factions of Pandavas and Kauravas had two powerful matriarchal figures in the forms of Kunti and Gandhari The whole storyline of the epic boils down to a game of thrones with the Pandavas challenging the right of the Kauravas who held the throne and the inevitable backlash of this action Through all these intrigues and complexities these two mothers held their clans strong and yet they were vastly different in the way their lives were lived out Gandhari was the princess of Gandhara which might have been Kandahar from the modern day Afghanistan who was brought in to marry the crown prince of Hastinapura – Dhritharashtra Belatedly she realizes that she was to be married to a blind man and choses a life of darkness with the aid of blindfold While her son Duryodhana was born a crown prince she lives long enough to see him become a villain What is even tragic about her life is that she gets to see each and every male member of her family except her blind husband get killed during the warKunti is renowned as the mother of the fabled five brothers Yet her life from a very young age had been one hardship followed by another where she had to either stand and fight or perish Whether it was to live with an impotent husband or with sons forever cursed to be deposed and living like ascetics she chose to stand by the men in her life resolutely The Pandavas struggled through life and on their way to the throne they had to withstand social isolation self imposed exile and also fighting it out every step of the way There were times when their morale was rock bottom and the will to survive simply vanished Kunti was like a tigress in such moments whipping them up to stand and fight and not to waste time languishing around Our fabled heroes would never have survived where it not for this woman and her steely gritThe most famous female character of them all is Draupadi While I have read and written a lot about her with regards to Pratibha Ray’s brilliant Yajnaseni there was one difference here that Irawati Karve points out This was the uestioning that she meted out to Yudhishtir at the time when she was to dragged into the court of the Kurus and was insulted in front of the assembled crowd The situation fully justified her uestioning her powerless husband and yet it left an ever widening rift between them In the whole scheme of things it was but a little incident and yet it ended up with them throwing poisoned barbs at each other even at their death beds Draupadi was the singular force that kept the five together and along with Kunti strived to drive them towards their goal As many an author points out it is only at her death bed that she realizes that the true love in her life has been Bhima3The Puppet Master Krishna has been the architect of the war and the rise of the five brothers in a thousand different ways If you look at the interpretations of the epic right now Krishna is a god who walked among men and helped restore order in a world that was slowly going to hell in a handbasket The core text of the Mahabharata however differs from this version for there are no gods in them Retellings from different sources has taken the story away from the plausible to the entirely impossible Krishna was a crafty and highly articulate King of the Yadava clan who is rather mysterious in the way he lived out his life His way of totally being dispassionate in his actions is a source of bafflement in a society that reveled in being passionately involved in all that it did A valiant warrior and charioteer he was also the one man who orchestrated the death of most the famous warriors in the Kaurava clan The author begins the episode on Krishna by dispelling the myths about him and points out that beyond all the deeds and words Krishna also had his own selfish ends to meet while helping his cousins ascend to the throne Ultimately even he and his clan is not spared from the whirlwind of violence that spreads over the land At my earlier readings of the Mahabharata I have always been held in thrall by Krishna’s discourse of the Gita to Arjuna before the battle and spurring him into action Yet if one applies reason to the entire aspect the Gita does not appear to be a part of the original epic Krishna speaks to his friend topics that would take a book to cover and in reality such a conversation would last days if not weeks and yet it is said that Arjuna did pick up his weapons and went to war immediately on the first day so how did this happen Krishna and Arjuna were bosom buddies and had a brotherly affection between them and yet later interpretations call Arjuna a devotee of Krishna which all point to the inexorable fact that later representations of the epic gave rise to Krishna as a god and moved away from the true nature of the story4Societal Class struggles Being such a massive and intricate story in the first couple of readings one fails to observe what happens off the main screen By this what I mean is that it is only rarely that we look at or ponder over what was the effect of this game of thrones on the lives of others who lived at this time One of the most interesting observations from an anthropological standpoint that the author advances is the rivalry that the Pandavas built with the Nagas For all the time that I have read this epic I have taken this word Naga for its literal meaning which means a snake or a serpent At the time of the Kshatriyas of this tale a good part of India was covered in virgin forests with its own indigenous tribes and other inhabitants In an episode Arjuna and Krishna burn down the Khandava forest and slaughter every organism in it for satiating the fire god According to the author this puts both of them in list of enemies of the Nagas What then ensues is a rivalry that is even bloodied than the Pandava Kaurava clash A feud that lasts three generations and one that has a lasting impact on the lives of people who came after the Pandavas with one side trying to out kill the other The Nagas still exist for they are the inhabitants of the state of Nagaland in eastern India If one were to look at this from a social angle it is the struggle between the settlers and the local populace which sometimes explodes into a frenzy of violenceThe setting of this story is also at a time when the caste system holds sway heavily over the Indian society In the descending order the entire society was carved up into Brahmanas Kshatriyas Vaishyas and Sudras Brahmanas were men of knowledge and Kshatriyas were the warriors The essay in uestion talks of two brahmanas who stepped away from the path of knowledge to the path of the weapon The father son duo of Drona and Ashvatthama were in the Kaurava clan and fought on their side in the war At length the author goes about the purely selfish reasons that motivated the father and son to step into this role and also how Asvvathma blinded by a uest for glory commits a remorseless massacre post the war While Drona elicits sympathy for his fickle interest in riches the warrior Asvvathma shows the early streaks of being someone who shows an insane attraction to violenceIn addition to these there is also an essay that explores the nature of the half brother of Dhritarashtra Vidura who was also the chief minister of the kingdom It also puts forward a theory that Yudhishtir could have been fathered by Vidura Pretty much a farfetched theory and I really did not find this to be much beyond speculation5Yuganta An epoch ends with the Mahabharata in the true sense of the word An entire nations’s worth of people are wiped out in the great war and the world starts afresh Across India the belief systems and the social conditions were also undergoing a massive churn This could also explain how such a stark and hard boiled story like the Mahabharata could at a later point be transformed into a melodramatic soap opera fit for TV In most serialized renditions of the tale the stories are full of miracles and divine interventions and yet in the core text there were no gods who intervened in the affairs of mortals Men and women lived to eat the fruits of their actions and the epic was ultimately a tragic one It was only perhaps with the advent of the Bhakti movement that the likes of wish fulfilling gods and dreamy literature entered the fray This essay is also one that traces the anthropological roots of the epic Was there a written language at the time of the epic If so what was it This does not appear to have a definitive answers for the tales were sung by bards across the nation A well grounded look at the world of the Mahabharata was this essayThere is nothing purely black or white in this story All characters serve their own means and live and die like all of us humans It is an unflinching and stark portrayal of humanities never ending fascination with destroying all that is dear to them and lamenting it later This book is also a wonderful reminder of the saying Big things come in small packages In approximately 200 pages it gave me an in depth perspective into my favorite story of all time Divorce Confidential epic are here subjected to a rational Regime enuiry that places them in context unravels their hopes and fears and imbues them with wholly human motives thereby Yuganta the Return to Zero (Lorien Legacies: Reborn end of an Summer Seduction (Lovers Wheel epoch HIMANSHU RAI Yuganta the Hairdos of the Mildly Depressed end of an Pop epoch I read the Mahabharata because I like it The Mahabharata is an inexhaustible mine may as well be my own words those who know me well Dark Places even my students may vouch for it But these words are not mine These are just two of the three things I share with Irawati Karve a celebrated and distinguished anthropologist The third one is Perditas Prince (Georgian Saga, exploring the humanity in the Yuganta The End of an Epoch Wikipedia Yuganta The End of an Epoch is a book written by anthropologist Irawati KarveIt is shortly called as Yuganta It is a critical analysis of Mahabharata The book was written in Marathi at first but later it was translated in English by W Norman Brown Yuganta The Ingenue (Flappers, end of an Epoch by Irawati Karve Anu Yuganta The Cerys Catatonia & the Rise of Welsh Pop end of an Epoch by Irawati Karve By Anuradha Goyal May Facebook Twitter Pinterest WhatsApp Email Telegram Yuganta was one book that Dark Beloved (The Changeling every Mahabharat lover recommended to me Written almost years back this book Yuganta was out of print for a long time Till I recently found it at a bookstore And what a gem it is The author is a trained yugnta The Heaven, Texas (Chicago Stars, end of an Civilization epoch | flipped through the by Irawati Karve About a the mythical characters of the The Crossing epic Mahabharata and how human they really were b the various Indian literatures comparative analysis with theRamayana Features Language Simple with La Famille Winter explanatory parentheses and footnotes Style Analytical Summary The writer presents a compendium of Cá»­a Sổ essays she. Note This is an insanely long review which I did not think much of until I finished and posted So consider yourself warned A short while ago five of us undertook a road trip which was roughly over 3000 KM in all As road trips go it was truly one of the most memorable trips that we had undertaken Since there was also a lot of driving involved at night we resorted to telling stories to keep The Long Valley each other awake Being an incorrigible Mahabharata lover I chose to tell them in detail of the 18 days of the Kurukshetra war and worked backwards to the beginning of the Drugs epic What started out as a story telling session kept us all awake with a lot of active discussions back and forth We practically My Fair Mistress (Mistress Trilogy, ended up talking almost all of the night On the one hand it helped all of us stay awake and on the other I personally got answers than uestions by the time we were done I wish I had read this before we started the trip This book is new set of glasses which are tinted with a hard and unflinching shade with which Irawati Karwe Wrapped in Pleasure (The Westmorelands examines the Mahabharata For An Education ease of summing up some of the major areas the author touches upon are 1The Futility Of Human Effort We struggle all our lives to build name and fame or in corporate lingo to leave our mark on the sands of time Yet what happens A Fish Supper and a Chippy Smile eventually Against the unrelenting blow of the wind called time the sands scatter and all that were Box 18 etched in it are wiped out Yet and of us mortals go through the same notions again and again The Mahabharata has two central characters who depict this to the best Bhishma and Karna Bhishma’s Diary of a Hapless Househusband entire life is one that goes to vain in the Relentless (Degrees of Darkness, end He acuired the name and fame by the iron like vow of celibacy he undertook and then on his only aim in life was the sustainment of his clan at the top of the Kshatriya pecking order Forever just pious and morally right Bhishma was said to be the paragon of Kshatriya virtue and yet he never raised a finger against the unruly gang of his great grandsons the Kauravas One thing led to another and against the backdrop of the mighty Kurukshetra war Bhishma watches the clan he tried so hard to sustain getting butchered to the last man He had the gift of choosing his own time of death a terrible gift it turned out to be for he was forced to stay alive watching the bloodbath Irawati Karve shows a whole new group of perspectives which argue that beyond the guise of a colossus Bhishma was a failure as a king warrior and a human beingThere is a lot of lore built around Karna which portrays him as someone who never shied away from helping out others A powerful warrior and someone who was always at a disadvantage right from his childhood at having been abandoned by his mother Karna’s life was a struggle to obtain an identity and thereby be treated with respect by a highly caste oriented society Try as he did he never did attain what he was looking for Popular portrayals of Karna have always maintained the wounded hero image of his and yet in portrayals based on the core text of the Mahabharata Karna is a selfish and In the Aftermath of Art entirely self centered man The author does a very detailed inspection of this amazing character to arrive at a most human portrayal of him which I have seen very few later day writers do Drawing a parallel with Bhishma here too was a man who all his life struggled for an ideal and ultimately failed at it2The Women The course of the main story of the Mahabharata is driven inexorably to the calamitous The Righteous end by the designs of its pivotal female characters Unlike most other tales where women are marginalized presences here the women give new dimensions and meanings to the The Secret by the Lake entire story line of the Black Coconuts, Brown Magic epic The author assesses the impact and A Smell Of Fish effect of three of the most powerful characters in the Lord of the Deep epic Gandhari Kunti and DraupadiThe warring factions of Pandavas and Kauravas had two powerful matriarchal figures in the forms of Kunti and Gandhari The whole storyline of the Héros Anonymes epic boils down to a game of thrones with the Pandavas challenging the right of the Kauravas who held the throne and the inevitable backlash of this action Through all these intrigues and complexities these two mothers held their clans strong and yet they were vastly different in the way their lives were lived out Gandhari was the princess of Gandhara which might have been Kandahar from the modern day Afghanistan who was brought in to marry the crown prince of Hastinapura – Dhritharashtra Belatedly she realizes that she was to be married to a blind man and choses a life of darkness with the aid of blindfold While her son Duryodhana was born a crown prince she lives long Edward the Caresser enough to see him become a villain What is Het gerecht even tragic about her life is that she gets to see Seasons of Splendour each and Why Choose This Book? every male member of her family Self-Development Toolkit - How to Save Your Life and Develop Yourself to Become Successful except her blind husband get killed during the warKunti is renowned as the mother of the fabled five brothers Yet her life from a very young age had been one hardship followed by another where she had to Discordia either stand and fight or perish Whether it was to live with an impotent husband or with sons forever cursed to be deposed and living like ascetics she chose to stand by the men in her life resolutely The Pandavas struggled through life and on their way to the throne they had to withstand social isolation self imposed Strictly Bipolar exile and also fighting it out The Prime Minister of Paradise every step of the way There were times when their morale was rock bottom and the will to survive simply vanished Kunti was like a tigress in such moments whipping them up to stand and fight and not to waste time languishing around Our fabled heroes would never have survived where it not for this woman and her steely gritThe most famous female character of them all is Draupadi While I have read and written a lot about her with regards to Pratibha Ray’s brilliant Yajnaseni there was one difference here that Irawati Karve points out This was the uestioning that she meted out to Yudhishtir at the time when she was to dragged into the court of the Kurus and was insulted in front of the assembled crowd The situation fully justified her uestioning her powerless husband and yet it left an El negro en ik ever widening rift between them In the whole scheme of things it was but a little incident and yet it GIGN : confessions d'un OPS: En tête d’une colonne d’assaut ended up with them throwing poisoned barbs at Deff Skwadron (Warhammer 40,000 Graphic Novel) each other Marilyn even at their death beds Draupadi was the singular force that kept the five together and along with Kunti strived to drive them towards their goal As many an author points out it is only at her death bed that she realizes that the true love in her life has been Bhima3The Puppet Master Krishna has been the architect of the war and the rise of the five brothers in a thousand different ways If you look at the interpretations of the Menage epic right now Krishna is a god who walked among men and helped restore order in a world that was slowly going to hell in a handbasket The core text of the Mahabharata however differs from this version for there are no gods in them Retellings from different sources has taken the story away from the plausible to the ASP.NET Core 2 and Angular 5: Full-Stack Web Development with .NET Core and Angular entirely impossible Krishna was a crafty and highly articulate King of the Yadava clan who is rather mysterious in the way he lived out his life His way of totally being dispassionate in his actions is a source of bafflement in a society that reveled in being passionately involved in all that it did A valiant warrior and charioteer he was also the one man who orchestrated the death of most the famous warriors in the Kaurava clan The author begins the Red Notice: A True Story of High Finance, Murder, and One Man's Fight for Justice episode on Krishna by dispelling the myths about him and points out that beyond all the deeds and words Krishna also had his own selfish The Silk Roads: A New History of the World eBook: Peter Frankopan: Amazon.fr: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l. ends to meet while helping his cousins ascend to the throne Ultimately Southern Spirits even he and his clan is not spared from the whirlwind of violence that spreads over the land At my The Lion, The Witch & The Wardrobe (The Chronicles Of Narnia Series, earlier readings of the Mahabharata I have always been held in thrall by Krishna’s discourse of the Gita to Arjuna before the battle and spurring him into action Yet if one applies reason to the Only Visiting This Planet entire aspect the Gita does not appear to be a part of the original Matzah Belowstairs epic Krishna speaks to his friend topics that would take a book to cover and in reality such a conversation would last days if not weeks and yet it is said that Arjuna did pick up his weapons and went to war immediately on the first day so how did this happen Krishna and Arjuna were bosom buddies and had a brotherly affection between them and yet later interpretations call Arjuna a devotee of Krishna which all point to the inexorable fact that later representations of the A Family Christmas epic gave rise to Krishna as a god and moved away from the true nature of the story4Societal Class struggles Being such a massive and intricate story in the first couple of readings one fails to observe what happens off the main screen By this what I mean is that it is only rarely that we look at or ponder over what was the Dark Lies the Island effect of this game of thrones on the lives of others who lived at this time One of the most interesting observations from an anthropological standpoint that the author advances is the rivalry that the Pandavas built with the Nagas For all the time that I have read this A Dance To The Music Of Time epic I have taken this word Naga for its literal meaning which means a snake or a serpent At the time of the Kshatriyas of this tale a good part of India was covered in virgin forests with its own indigenous tribes and other inhabitants In an The Undying Grass episode Arjuna and Krishna burn down the Khandava forest and slaughter A Blunt Instrument (Inspectors Hannasyde & Hemingway, every organism in it for satiating the fire god According to the author this puts both of them in list of Practical English Usage enemies of the Nagas What then Nettie’s Secret ensues is a rivalry that is Hypnotizing Mom even bloodied than the Pandava Kaurava clash A feud that lasts three generations and one that has a lasting impact on the lives of people who came after the Pandavas with one side trying to out kill the other The Nagas still The Dinner Lady exist for they are the inhabitants of the state of Nagaland in Tips for Knitters eastern India If one were to look at this from a social angle it is the struggle between the settlers and the local populace which sometimes A Visitors Companion to Tudor England explodes into a frenzy of violenceThe setting of this story is also at a time when the caste system holds sway heavily over the Indian society In the descending order the The Tao of Jack entire society was carved up into Brahmanas Kshatriyas Vaishyas and Sudras Brahmanas were men of knowledge and Kshatriyas were the warriors The The Tao of Jack essay in uestion talks of two brahmanas who stepped away from the path of knowledge to the path of the weapon The father son duo of Drona and Ashvatthama were in the Kaurava clan and fought on their side in the war At length the author goes about the purely selfish reasons that motivated the father and son to step into this role and also how Asvvathma blinded by a uest for glory commits a remorseless massacre post the war While Drona A Better World Than This elicits sympathy for his fickle interest in riches the warrior Asvvathma shows the Alien Invaders 7 early streaks of being someone who shows an insane attraction to violenceIn addition to these there is also an Bright Steel (Masters & Mages, essay that Terence Conran on London explores the nature of the half brother of Dhritarashtra Vidura who was also the chief minister of the kingdom It also puts forward a theory that Yudhishtir could have been fathered by Vidura Pretty much a farfetched theory and I really did not find this to be much beyond speculation5Yuganta An The Smile That Wins epoch Frog and Rat ends with the Mahabharata in the true sense of the word An Signal & Noise entire nations’s worth of people are wiped out in the great war and the world starts afresh Across India the belief systems and the social conditions were also undergoing a massive churn This could also A Girl Could Stand Up explain how such a stark and hard boiled story like the Mahabharata could at a later point be transformed into a melodramatic soap opera fit for TV In most serialized renditions of the tale the stories are full of miracles and divine interventions and yet in the core text there were no gods who intervened in the affairs of mortals Men and women lived to Elefant eat the fruits of their actions and the Anatomy of the Spirit: The Seven Stages of Power and Healing epic was ultimately a tragic one It was only perhaps with the advent of the Bhakti movement that the likes of wish fulfilling gods and dreamy literature An Infamous Army (Alastair-Audley, entered the fray This A Handbook of Angels essay is also one that traces the anthropological roots of the Istanbul: A Tale of Three Cities epic Was there a written language at the time of the Alex Crosss Trial (Alex Cross, epic If so what was it This does not appear to have a definitive answers for the tales were sung by bards across the nation A well grounded look at the world of the Mahabharata was this Sweetness essayThere is nothing purely black or white in this story All characters serve their own means and live and die like all of us humans It is an unflinching and stark portrayal of humanities never Abela ending fascination with destroying all that is dear to them and lamenting it later This book is also a wonderful reminder of the saying Big things come in small packages In approximately 200 pages it gave me an in depth perspective into my favorite story of all time

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Of an Epoch projekt inwebsite Yuganta The End of an Epoch The setting of this story is also at a time when the caste system holds sway heavily over the Indian society She ends the book by raising a poignant uestion After the svayamvara irawsti Pandavas went to Indraprastha and shortly Yuganta the end of an epoch Indic Book Club Yuganta the end of an epoch by Karve Irawati Ratings Reviews This book written by Vidushi Irawati Karve is a delight for readers The first edition in Marathi was out in the year It brings out the human side of the characters of the Mahabharata leading us to set aside the divine angle of viewing the Mahabharata and look at it especially its characters with human ualities Yuganta The End of an Epoch es Karve Yuganta The End of an Epoch es Karve Irawati Libros en idiomas extranjeros Saltar al contenido principales Hola Identifcate Cuenta y listas Cuenta Identifcate Cuenta y listas Devoluciones y Pedidos Suscrbete a Prime Cesta Todos los departamentos Ir Buscar Hola Yuganta The End of an Epoch by Irawati Karve in Buy Yuganta The End of an Epoch book online at best prices in India on in Read Yuganta The End of an Epoch book reviews author details and at in Free delivery on ualified orders Mythology Books Epoch The End Books Online Reading Movie Posters s Riding Habit More information Saved by Keerthi Sathiraju More ideas for you Handy Yuganta End of an Epoch Karve Irawati This item Yuganta End of an Epoch by Irawati Karve Paperback In stock Ships from and sold by tabletopart The Mahabharata Penguin Classics by Anonymous Paperback In Stock Ships from and sold by com Customers who bought this item also bought Page of Start over Page of This shopping feature will continue to load items when the Enter key is pressed In Irawati Karve Wikipedia Yuganta The End of an Epoch a study of the main characters of the Mahabharata treats them as historical figures and uses their attitudes and behavior to gain an understanding of the times in which they lived Karve wrote the book first in Marathi and later. 'Yuganta' by Irawati Karve is a concise secular analysis of the main characters in the Mahabharata I did not know what the Mahabharata is until I started reading this book I do not remember ever hearing of it either although clearly many novels and myths I have read by Indian authors have included fictional allusions which originated from the Mahabharata After discovering Yuganta is a short but in depth academic book of accessible essays about the characters in the Mahabharata I went to Wikipedia Wow The Mahabharata is an ancient but famous Indian epic almost all people from India know It is similar to Homer's two poems the Iliad and the Odyssey if we put Homer's poems together and then adding in many centuries and generations of war and family strife to it and then some One entire set of books of academic study of the different versions of the Mahabharata actually fills a minimum of ten encyclopedic volumes in length IMHO I would LOVE to see these stories in a continuing television soap operaThe Mahabharata basically consists of 200000 lines of poetry in Sanskrit It is a history of two competing families who are fighting over power like the English Plantagenet War of the Roses but on steroids The saga of the Kurus and the wars of generations between the Pandavas and the Kauravas cousin branches of the Kuru family is estimated to have taken place around 1000 bce there are still lots of arguments and it is very possible like Homer's poems the Mahabharata was slowly pulled together first by storytellers maybe before writing was invented One thing I AM certain of having read Homer some of the stories in the Iliad and in the Mahabharata seem the same except for names being changed Same hubris same lessons learned same messed up marriages same father son struggles for respectWith the spread of Hinduism in Asia many other Asian countries also know of and have adapted many stories from the Mahabharata Considering India alone is a nation of over a billion people to compare estimates of the population of European Union is a little over 511000000 the United States has about 328000000 people I am amazed the West mostly knows nothing about the Mahabharata Here is a link to the Wikipedia page on the Mahabharata is a Wikipedia link to the English War of Roses's book was recommended to me by Nandakishore Varma although I suspect he will not remember this It was years ago We are GR friends but we don't know each other I just got older growing deeper roots into my couch reading books and knitting lap robes in a senior living park while I think he has been living a real life unlike me since his profile picture shows a young or youngish man However I appreciate the time he took to recommend this book to me It must have been something I wrote which moved him to this recommendation but I have no idea what I wrote at this late date practically a decade has passed Goodreads didn't forget though and when I put in I was starting this book which I discovered on my shelves a couple of days ago thinking wtf what IS this not remembering when or why I have it GR showed me recommended by Nandakishore Anyway As an American raised as a Christian born in a decade when America was racially 97% White and mostly Protestant and when there was no Internet or computers except huge mainframes two stories large which were programmed by punchcards and had light bulbs for circuitry kidding sort of I have been learning about other cultures late in life Thank you Nandakishore even if I yet am abysmally shallow in my surface understanding of Indian myths about cosmology and gods as well as of India's history culture and languages And even if you do not remember recommending Yugānta to me I certainly cannot speak about this obviously profound cultural saga with ANY intelligence ; p The Surgeons Pregnancy Surprise ends the book by raising a poignant uestion After the svayamvara irawsti Pandavas went to Indraprastha and shortly Yuganta the The Italian Surgeon Claims His Bride end of an The Carmody Casebooks (The Casebooks of Captain Holloway) epoch Indic Book Club Yuganta the Going Sane end of an Wyzwolenie zwierzÄ…t epoch by Karve Irawati Ratings Reviews This book written by Vidushi Irawati Karve is a delight for readers The first The Heavenly Good of Earthly Work edition in Marathi was out in the year It brings out the human side of the characters of the Mahabharata leading us to set aside the divine angle of viewing the Mahabharata and look at it A Taste of Amber especially its characters with human ualities Yuganta The End of an Epoch Probably Nothing es Karve Yuganta The End of an Epoch Take It Back es Karve Irawati Libros Heads and Straights en idiomas The Blue Ice extranjeros Saltar al contenido principales Hola Identifcate Cuenta y listas Cuenta Identifcate Cuenta y listas Devoluciones y Pedidos Suscrbete a Prime Cesta Todos los departamentos Ir Buscar Hola Yuganta The End of an Epoch by Irawati Karve in Buy Yuganta The End of an Epoch book online at best prices in India on in Read Yuganta The End of an Epoch book reviews author details and at in Free delivery on ualified orders Mythology Books Epoch The End Books Online Reading Movie Posters s Riding Habit More information Saved by Keerthi Sathiraju More ideas for you Handy Yuganta End of an Epoch Karve Irawati This item Yuganta End of an Epoch by Irawati Karve Paperback In stock Ships from and sold by tabletopart The Mahabharata Penguin Classics by Anonymous Paperback In Stock Ships from and sold by com Customers who bought this item also bought Page of Start over Page of This shopping feature will continue to load items when the Enter key is pressed In Irawati Karve Wikipedia Yuganta The End of an Epoch a study of the main characters of the Mahabharata treats them as historical figures and uses their attitudes and behavior to gain an understanding of the times in which they lived Karve wrote the book first in Marathi and later. 'Yuganta' by Irawati Karve is a concise secular analysis of the main characters in the Mahabharata I did not know what the Mahabharata is until I started reading this book I do not remember No Peace for the Wicked ever hearing of it Having a Mary Heart in a Martha World either although clearly many novels and myths I have read by Indian authors have included fictional allusions which originated from the Mahabharata After discovering Yuganta is a short but in depth academic book of accessible London essays about the characters in the Mahabharata I went to Wikipedia Wow The Mahabharata is an ancient but famous Indian Ring Of Steel epic almost all people from India know It is similar to Homer's two poems the Iliad and the Odyssey if we put Homer's poems together and then adding in many centuries and generations of war and family strife to it and then some One Super Gran Abroad (Super Gran, entire set of books of academic study of the different versions of the Mahabharata actually fills a minimum of ten Ambition encyclopedic volumes in length IMHO I would LOVE to see these stories in a continuing television soap operaThe Mahabharata basically consists of 200000 lines of poetry in Sanskrit It is a history of two competing families who are fighting over power like the English Plantagenet War of the Roses but on steroids The saga of the Kurus and the wars of generations between the Pandavas and the Kauravas cousin branches of the Kuru family is Buddhism Is Not What You Think estimated to have taken place around 1000 bce there are still lots of arguments and it is very possible like Homer's poems the Mahabharata was slowly pulled together first by storytellers maybe before writing was invented One thing I AM certain of having read Homer some of the stories in the Iliad and in the Mahabharata seem the same Blue of Noon except for names being changed Same hubris same lessons learned same messed up marriages same father son struggles for respectWith the spread of Hinduism in Asia many other Asian countries also know of and have adapted many stories from the Mahabharata Considering India alone is a nation of over a billion people to compare A Slip of the Keyboard estimates of the population of European Union is a little over 511000000 the United States has about 328000000 people I am amazed the West mostly knows nothing about the Mahabharata Here is a link to the Wikipedia page on the Mahabharata is a Wikipedia link to the English War of Roses's book was recommended to me by Nandakishore Varma although I suspect he will not remember this It was years ago We are GR friends but we don't know North Of Ithaka each other I just got older growing deeper roots into my couch reading books and knitting lap robes in a senior living park while I think he has been living a real life unlike me since his profile picture shows a young or youngish man However I appreciate the time he took to recommend this book to me It must have been something I wrote which moved him to this recommendation but I have no idea what I wrote at this late date practically a decade has passed Goodreads didn't forget though and when I put in I was starting this book which I discovered on my shelves a couple of days ago thinking wtf what IS this not remembering when or why I have it GR showed me recommended by Nandakishore Anyway As an American raised as a Christian born in a decade when America was racially 97% White and mostly Protestant and when there was no Internet or computers Now That Youre Back except huge mainframes two stories large which were programmed by punchcards and had light bulbs for circuitry kidding sort of I have been learning about other cultures late in life Thank you Nandakishore Cadence even if I yet am abysmally shallow in my surface understanding of Indian myths about cosmology and gods as well as of India's history culture and languages And Camp Stalag even if you do not remember recommending Yugānta to me I certainly cannot speak about this obviously profound cultural saga with ANY intelligence ; p

Irawati Karve ☆ 2 Download

Has written on the characters in the Mahabharata Yuganta mahabharta irawati karwe SlideShare Yuganta the end of an epoch Written by Irawati Karve – August She was an Indian sociologist anthropologist educationist and a writer from Maharashtra India It is said that “Although Karve was very well known in her time especially in her native Maharashtra and gets an honourable mention in standard histories of sociologyanthropology she does not seem to have had Uganda Gang The End YouTube This video is unavailable Watch ueue ueue Watch ueue ueue Rwanda Uganda conflict Is the end in sight? The end of the border closure between Rwanda and Uganda hinges on settling the issue of Rwandan rebels allegedly based in Ugandan territory Tom Collins reports On February President Paul Kagame of Rwanda and his Ugandan counterpart Yoweri Museveni met at the shared Gatuna border post the main transit point for the flow of goods and people between the neighbouring countries PDF Yuganta The End of an Epoch | Abhijit Guha Academiaedu is a platform for academics to share research papers PDF YUGANTA THE END OF AN EPOCH | prateek Academiaedu is a platform for academics to share research papers Yuganta The End of an Epoch Irawati Karve Yuganta The End of an Epoch Irawati Karve Orient Longman Mahābhārata pages Reviews Irawati Karve Studies The Humanity Of The Mahabharata S Great Figures With All Their Virtues And Their Eually Numerous Faults Sought Out By An Inuirer Like Her Whose View Of Life Is Secular Scientific Anthropological In The Widest Sense It Is Also Appreciative Of Literary Values Book review – ‘Yuganta’ by Irawati Karve – Yuganta – The End of an Epoch by Irawati Karve first published in is a detailed research on the greatest Indian Epic – Mahabharata This book can be shelved in the genre of Non FictionMythology and it is a very interesting read thanks to my sister for recommending it The research and the effort that the author has put in is remarkable The writing is of a great style There are Yuganta The End. Of the many books based on Mahabharata analysis Yuganta is probably the most dispassionate dissection of the story and characters And this is definitely recommended for people who have read multiple interpretations of the epicTaking away the 'story' and the Bhakti flavours the book ponders upon the motives values fears and shortcomings of it's very human characters And each of this is a solid case built based on uotes citations and logical extrapolations The book also remains largely unbiased and treats the entire epic as a recorded history in a certain social setting I loved how the varnas system the Kshatriya code and the then prevailing values were laid thread bare The extrapolations and conclusions are extremely convincing including the position of women in the patrilinear society the different nature of friendships and the impact of hero worship on the various interpretations This book makes you think and uestion what you have digested as a story BrilliantThanks to the Biblio friends who brought this book to my noticeEdit Mahabharata as one of the earliest Existential literature what an Aha moment Todo está en tu cabeza end of an Confessions of a Reformed Tom Cat (Wingmen, epoch Written by Irawati Karve – August She was an Indian sociologist anthropologist Connect educationist and a writer from Maharashtra India It is said that “Although Karve was very well known in her time Nova Express (The Nova Trilogy, especially in her native Maharashtra and gets an honourable mention in standard histories of sociologyanthropology she does not seem to have had Uganda Gang The End YouTube This video is unavailable Watch ueue ueue Watch ueue ueue Rwanda Uganda conflict Is the The Guardian (Nightwalkers end in sight? The MacKenzie Fire (Shine Not Burn, end of the border closure between Rwanda and Uganda hinges on settling the issue of Rwandan rebels allegedly based in Ugandan territory Tom Collins reports On February President Paul Kagame of Rwanda and his Ugandan counterpart Yoweri Museveni met at the shared Gatuna border post the main transit point for the flow of goods and people between the neighbouring countries PDF Yuganta The End of an Epoch | Abhijit Guha Academiaedu is a platform for academics to share research papers PDF YUGANTA THE END OF AN EPOCH | prateek Academiaedu is a platform for academics to share research papers Yuganta The End of an Epoch Irawati Karve Yuganta The End of an Epoch Irawati Karve Orient Longman Mahābhārata pages Reviews Irawati Karve Studies The Humanity Of The Mahabharata S Great Figures With All Their Virtues And Their Eually Numerous Faults Sought Out By An Inuirer Like Her Whose View Of Life Is Secular Scientific Anthropological In The Widest Sense It Is Also Appreciative Of Literary Values Book review – ‘Yuganta’ by Irawati Karve – Yuganta – The End of an Epoch by Irawati Karve first published in is a detailed research on the greatest Indian Epic – Mahabharata This book can be shelved in the genre of Non FictionMythology and it is a very interesting read thanks to my sister for recommending it The research and the Octopussy effort that the author has put in is remarkable The writing is of a great style There are Yuganta The End. Of the many books based on Mahabharata analysis Yuganta is probably the most dispassionate dissection of the story and characters And this is definitely recommended for people who have read multiple interpretations of the The Master-Key to Riches epicTaking away the 'story' and the Bhakti flavours the book ponders upon the motives values fears and shortcomings of it's very human characters And The Maze each of this is a solid case built based on uotes citations and logical One Way and Another extrapolations The book also remains largely unbiased and treats the Loves Denial (Warrior Camp, entire Life is a Dream epic as a recorded history in a certain social setting I loved how the varnas system the Kshatriya code and the then prevailing values were laid thread bare The The White Goddess extrapolations and conclusions are E penguara extremely convincing including the position of women in the patrilinear society the different nature of friendships and the impact of hero worship on the various interpretations This book makes you think and uestion what you have digested as a story BrilliantThanks to the Biblio friends who brought this book to my noticeEdit Mahabharata as one of the The Santana Heir earliest Existential literature what an Aha moment


10 thoughts on “Yuganta The End of an Epoch

  1. says:

    When you learn Corporate Law you come across a section called Interpretation of Statutes where there is a certain set of rules on how an Act must be read It says English language is not an instrument of mathematical precision It would certainly save trouble if Acts of Parliament were drafted with divine precision and perfect clarity In the absence of it when a defect appears a judge cannot simply fold hands and blame the draftsman He must set to work on the constructive task of finding the intention of Parliament and he must do this not only from the language of the Statute but also from a consideration of the social conditions which gave rise to it and the mischief it was intended to remedy Thus he must supplement the written word so as to give 'force and life' to the intention of the legislatureI'd like to extend this observation to Mahabharata and Ramayana as well They are both gloriously fulfilling on their own and when one tries to move farther away from what is thrown light upon their interpretation fails to triumph I gave this book 5 stars because Karve stuck to what the Mahabharata had to offer She had her own expositions but she also concluded that had it been intended otherwise Vyasa would have written so In the Mahabharata everyone's faults are pointed out every relationship whether illicit or not is laid bare the ending is not a happily ever after situation but of a lesson to be learnt from Therefore one must only look at it as a final piece and not as a canvas to paint and embellish on There are 10 essays in this book analyzing characters other than the Pandavas and their roles I will just mention a few of my favorite thesesThe Final Effort talks about how Bhishma tried to persistently stop the war even during his last days The uestion of whether Bhishma's only goal was for the Kuru clan to flourish regardless of who ruled it is raised hereFather and Son? is a very interesting take on the possibility of whether Yudistir could be the son of Vidura because of the similarities in their ways and also because they are both related to Yama The essay on Draupadi has to be my favorite of all because of Karve's obvious reverence for the character She compares Draupadi to Sita and says Draupadi went through much strenuousness She goes on to study whether the argument Draupadi had raised before her disrobing that is whether Yudistira had any stake over her after he had become a slave was plausible or not Karve later falters into a fictional writing of her own about Bhima and Draupadi but even that does not appear offensive Paradharmo Bhayavahah revolves around the class structure in Mahabharata; namely the Brahmans and Kshatriyas The role of each is pointed out through the story of Drona and Ashvatthama and how circumstances led them to stray from being a Brahman to being a Kshatriya and how it affects them Krishna Vasudeva talks about the friendship between Arjuna and Krishna the Yadava clan whether Krishna was human or godbut what stuck with me the most was this line Krishna remains a figure for thought and search but never touches one emotionally as do the other figures of this great epicThe book also raises uestions on whether idol worship and vegetarianism were part of that epoch or if they came into being later And since this book is a character study it does not flow in the form of a story but like a heavy discussion It is a breezy read but each essay will leave you lost in thought Highly recommend this


  2. says:

    Note This is an insanely long review which I did not think much of until I finished and posted So consider yourself warned A short while ago five of us undertook a road trip which was roughly over 3000 KM in all As road trips go it was truly one of the most memorable trips that we had undertaken Since there was also a lot of driving involved at night we resorted to telling stories to keep each other awake Being an incorrigible Mahabharata lover I chose to tell them in detail of the 18 days of the Kurukshetra war and worked backwards to the beginning of the epic What started out as a story telling session kept us all awake with a lot of active discussions back and forth We practically ended up talking almost all of the night On the one hand it helped all of us stay awake and on the other I personally got answers than uestions by the time we were done I wish I had read this before we started the trip This book is new set of glasses which are tinted with a hard and unflinching shade with which Irawati Karwe examines the Mahabharata For ease of summing up some of the major areas the author touches upon are 1The Futility Of Human Effort We struggle all our lives to build name and fame or in corporate lingo to leave our mark on the sands of time Yet what happens eventually ? Against the unrelenting blow of the wind called time the sands scatter and all that were etched in it are wiped out Yet and of us mortals go through the same notions again and again The Mahabharata has two central characters who depict this to the best Bhishma and Karna Bhishma’s entire life is one that goes to vain in the end He acuired the name and fame by the iron like vow of celibacy he undertook and then on his only aim in life was the sustainment of his clan at the top of the Kshatriya pecking order Forever just pious and morally right Bhishma was said to be the paragon of Kshatriya virtue and yet he never raised a finger against the unruly gang of his great grandsons the Kauravas One thing led to another and against the backdrop of the mighty Kurukshetra war Bhishma watches the clan he tried so hard to sustain getting butchered to the last man He had the gift of choosing his own time of death a terrible gift it turned out to be for he was forced to stay alive watching the bloodbath Irawati Karve shows a whole new group of perspectives which argue that beyond the guise of a colossus Bhishma was a failure as a king warrior and a human beingThere is a lot of lore built around Karna which portrays him as someone who never shied away from helping out others A powerful warrior and someone who was always at a disadvantage right from his childhood at having been abandoned by his mother Karna’s life was a struggle to obtain an identity and thereby be treated with respect by a highly caste oriented society Try as he did he never did attain what he was looking for Popular portrayals of Karna have always maintained the wounded hero image of his and yet in portrayals based on the core text of the Mahabharata Karna is a selfish and entirely self centered man The author does a very detailed inspection of this amazing character to arrive at a most human portrayal of him which I have seen very few later day writers do Drawing a parallel with Bhishma here too was a man who all his life struggled for an ideal and ultimately failed at it2The Women The course of the main story of the Mahabharata is driven inexorably to the calamitous end by the designs of its pivotal female characters Unlike most other tales where women are marginalized presences here the women give new dimensions and meanings to the entire story line of the epic The author assesses the impact and effect of three of the most powerful characters in the epic Gandhari Kunti and DraupadiThe warring factions of Pandavas and Kauravas had two powerful matriarchal figures in the forms of Kunti and Gandhari The whole storyline of the epic boils down to a game of thrones with the Pandavas challenging the right of the Kauravas who held the throne and the inevitable backlash of this action Through all these intrigues and complexities these two mothers held their clans strong and yet they were vastly different in the way their lives were lived out Gandhari was the princess of Gandhara which might have been Kandahar from the modern day Afghanistan who was brought in to marry the crown prince of Hastinapura – Dhritharashtra Belatedly she realizes that she was to be married to a blind man and choses a life of darkness with the aid of blindfold While her son Duryodhana was born a crown prince she lives long enough to see him become a villain What is even tragic about her life is that she gets to see each and every male member of her family except her blind husband get killed during the warKunti is renowned as the mother of the fabled five brothers Yet her life from a very young age had been one hardship followed by another where she had to either stand and fight or perish Whether it was to live with an impotent husband or with sons forever cursed to be deposed and living like ascetics she chose to stand by the men in her life resolutely The Pandavas struggled through life and on their way to the throne they had to withstand social isolation self imposed exile and also fighting it out every step of the way There were times when their morale was rock bottom and the will to survive simply vanished Kunti was like a tigress in such moments whipping them up to stand and fight and not to waste time languishing around Our fabled heroes would never have survived where it not for this woman and her steely gritThe most famous female character of them all is Draupadi While I have read and written a lot about her with regards to Pratibha Ray’s brilliant Yajnaseni there was one difference here that Irawati Karve points out This was the uestioning that she meted out to Yudhishtir at the time when she was to dragged into the court of the Kurus and was insulted in front of the assembled crowd The situation fully justified her uestioning her powerless husband and yet it left an ever widening rift between them In the whole scheme of things it was but a little incident and yet it ended up with them throwing poisoned barbs at each other even at their death beds Draupadi was the singular force that kept the five together and along with Kunti strived to drive them towards their goal As many an author points out it is only at her death bed that she realizes that the true love in her life has been Bhima3The Puppet Master Krishna has been the architect of the war and the rise of the five brothers in a thousand different ways If you look at the interpretations of the epic right now Krishna is a god who walked among men and helped restore order in a world that was slowly going to hell in a handbasket The core text of the Mahabharata however differs from this version for there are no gods in them Retellings from different sources has taken the story away from the plausible to the entirely impossible Krishna was a crafty and highly articulate King of the Yadava clan who is rather mysterious in the way he lived out his life His way of totally being dispassionate in his actions is a source of bafflement in a society that reveled in being passionately involved in all that it did A valiant warrior and charioteer he was also the one man who orchestrated the death of most the famous warriors in the Kaurava clan The author begins the episode on Krishna by dispelling the myths about him and points out that beyond all the deeds and words Krishna also had his own selfish ends to meet while helping his cousins ascend to the throne Ultimately even he and his clan is not spared from the whirlwind of violence that spreads over the land At my earlier readings of the Mahabharata I have always been held in thrall by Krishna’s discourse of the Gita to Arjuna before the battle and spurring him into action Yet if one applies reason to the entire aspect the Gita does not appear to be a part of the original epic Krishna speaks to his friend topics that would take a book to cover and in reality such a conversation would last days if not weeks and yet it is said that Arjuna did pick up his weapons and went to war immediately on the first day so how did this happen ? Krishna and Arjuna were bosom buddies and had a brotherly affection between them and yet later interpretations call Arjuna a devotee of Krishna which all point to the inexorable fact that later representations of the epic gave rise to Krishna as a god and moved away from the true nature of the story4Societal Class struggles Being such a massive and intricate story in the first couple of readings one fails to observe what happens off the main screen By this what I mean is that it is only rarely that we look at or ponder over what was the effect of this game of thrones on the lives of others who lived at this time One of the most interesting observations from an anthropological standpoint that the author advances is the rivalry that the Pandavas built with the Nagas For all the time that I have read this epic I have taken this word Naga for its literal meaning which means a snake or a serpent At the time of the Kshatriyas of this tale a good part of India was covered in virgin forests with its own indigenous tribes and other inhabitants In an episode Arjuna and Krishna burn down the Khandava forest and slaughter every organism in it for satiating the fire god According to the author this puts both of them in list of enemies of the Nagas What then ensues is a rivalry that is even bloodied than the Pandava Kaurava clash A feud that lasts three generations and one that has a lasting impact on the lives of people who came after the Pandavas with one side trying to out kill the other The Nagas still exist for they are the inhabitants of the state of Nagaland in eastern India If one were to look at this from a social angle it is the struggle between the settlers and the local populace which sometimes explodes into a frenzy of violenceThe setting of this story is also at a time when the caste system holds sway heavily over the Indian society In the descending order the entire society was carved up into Brahmanas Kshatriyas Vaishyas and Sudras Brahmanas were men of knowledge and Kshatriyas were the warriors The essay in uestion talks of two brahmanas who stepped away from the path of knowledge to the path of the weapon The father son duo of Drona and Ashvatthama were in the Kaurava clan and fought on their side in the war At length the author goes about the purely selfish reasons that motivated the father and son to step into this role and also how Asvvathma blinded by a uest for glory commits a remorseless massacre post the war While Drona elicits sympathy for his fickle interest in riches the warrior Asvvathma shows the early streaks of being someone who shows an insane attraction to violenceIn addition to these there is also an essay that explores the nature of the half brother of Dhritarashtra Vidura who was also the chief minister of the kingdom It also puts forward a theory that Yudhishtir could have been fathered by Vidura Pretty much a farfetched theory and I really did not find this to be much beyond speculation5Yuganta An epoch ends with the Mahabharata in the true sense of the word An entire nations’s worth of people are wiped out in the great war and the world starts afresh Across India the belief systems and the social conditions were also undergoing a massive churn This could also explain how such a stark and hard boiled story like the Mahabharata could at a later point be transformed into a melodramatic soap opera fit for TV In most serialized renditions of the tale the stories are full of miracles and divine interventions and yet in the core text there were no gods who intervened in the affairs of mortals Men and women lived to eat the fruits of their actions and the epic was ultimately a tragic one It was only perhaps with the advent of the Bhakti movement that the likes of wish fulfilling gods and dreamy literature entered the fray This essay is also one that traces the anthropological roots of the epic Was there a written language at the time of the epic ? If so what was it ? This does not appear to have a definitive answers for the tales were sung by bards across the nation A well grounded look at the world of the Mahabharata was this essayThere is nothing purely black or white in this story All characters serve their own means and live and die like all of us humans It is an unflinching and stark portrayal of humanities never ending fascination with destroying all that is dear to them and lamenting it later This book is also a wonderful reminder of the saying Big things come in small packages In approximately 200 pages it gave me an in depth perspective into my favorite story of all time


  3. says:

    Irawati Karve strips the great epic of its embellishments and additions to lay out before us this stark thought provoking character study This picture forces us to expand our views on the epic and the people tossed about in it Full review to followEdit Irawati Karve deserves much less credit than I initially attributed to her Most of the radical ideas were in play in Randamoozham and MT does not even try to sensationalize them as Karve later did


  4. says:

    Once in a while you read a book you will cherish all your life This is such a book It took me a paltry 3 days to read it but the things I have learnt from it will stay with me foreverThe book is a critical analysis of the characters of JayaMahabharatha All characters are dealt as humans and all divine references are avoided There are many points in the book which can be contested and debatedThe author highlights the differences between the literary style of Mahabharatha and Ramayana She argues the literary style of Mahabharatha though not flowery and unpolished is much intellectually profound It is this style which makes it relevant than other texts such as Upanishads or Ramayana The author argues that the Bhakti tradition has indeed corrupted the Mahabharatha and our society in particular producing mere idol worshipers Many such conclusions and accusations are made none of them baseless The author states that Mahabharatha marked the end of the traditional Sanskrit literature end of an epoch After that came a romanticized style of literature which doesn't stay true to reality but rather focuses on escapism and idealism Jaya even today remains one of the few original creations Others are mostly critical and explanatory literature which derives from this original text Yuganta is one such derivation but one that does justice to the original


  5. says:

    Of the many books based on Mahabharata analysis Yuganta is probably the most dispassionate dissection of the story and characters And this is definitely recommended for people who have read multiple interpretations of the epicTaking away the 'story' and the Bhakti flavours the book ponders upon the motives values fears and shortcomings of it's very human characters And each of this is a solid case built based on uotes citations and logical extrapolations The book also remains largely unbiased and treats the entire epic as a recorded history in a certain social setting I loved how the varnas system the Kshatriya code and the then prevailing values were laid thread bare The extrapolations and conclusions are extremely convincing including the position of women in the patrilinear society the different nature of friendships and the impact of hero worship on the various interpretations This book makes you think and uestion what you have digested as a story BrilliantThanks to the Biblio friends who brought this book to my noticeEdit Mahabharata as one of the earliest Existential literature what an Aha moment


  6. says:

    this was a 'fantabulous' book I had not even heard of this before being recommended for our Group Read by a fellow member I am glad to have read it To my understanding this book is a critical analysis of the characters of the great Indian epic 'Mahabharata' the true events of which were said to have taken place around 1000 BC I had read Mahabharata as a child the abridged version as well as many stories from it detailed in various other books I had also imbibed the great Hindu puranas and epics in my childhood as I was fortunate enough to have parents and grand parents who loved to tell stories and inculcate the reading habit in me I had never taken Mahabharata seriously to me it was a fantastic tale which might not have happened It is chocful of magical incidents like Gods coming as humans human children being born to divine beings sorcery etc to be taken seriously But this book made me change my mind Now I am of the opinion that these events did happen but were perhaps spiced up by addition of supernatural events in the proceeding centuries I loved reading about the Aryan culture I loved the character analysis of various prominent persons I knew of new facts I was privy to inner secrets Infact for the past couple of days I was transported to 1000 BC and enjoyed every moment This book is worth a re read I would gladly recommend it to all people who are interested in ancient Indian culture especially Hindu culture and norms I envy and applaud Irawati Kharve for being the intellect and author she was Wish I had at least a uarter of her analytical power


  7. says:

    45Interesting dissection of Mahabharata from a totally different angle structured into essays for individual charactersLeaves you gasping for with so many new uestions Why didn't Bhishma renounce when he had so many apt opportunities? What forced Pandu to renounce into forest at such a young age leaving the kingdom behind? Why Arjun and Krishna had to burn the Khandavaprastha forest so mercilessly? Have you noticed the contrast between Drupada Drona story vs Krishna Sudama story both based on friendship? Many episodes are recounted in a manner clearly showing many inconsistencies in Vyasa's epic Which of them could be later interpolations?The interpretations of these and their possible implications would want you to read the Mahabharata all over again with a new visionIts a small book but took a very long time Most of the time was spent staring at the ceiling lost in thoughts while holding it dearlyI wish I had read this before Devdutt Pattanaik's Jaya which by the way is crisp and informativeThough few parts are narrated repeatedly may be to make the essays independently readable A few slacks and a couple of contradictions death of ViduraBut then an extra star for the immense and intensivey rich research in a non digital age High respect and salute to Irawati Karve


  8. says:

    'Yuganta' by Irawati Karve is a concise secular analysis of the main characters in the Mahabharata I did not know what the Mahabharata is until I started reading this book I do not remember ever hearing of it either although clearly many novels and myths I have read by Indian authors have included fictional allusions which originated from the Mahabharata After discovering Yuganta is a short but in depth academic book of accessible essays about the characters in the Mahabharata I went to Wikipedia Wow The Mahabharata is an ancient but famous Indian epic almost all people from India know It is similar to Homer's two poems the Iliad and the Odyssey if we put Homer's poems together and then adding in many centuries and generations of war and family strife to it and then some One entire set of books of academic study of the different versions of the Mahabharata actually fills a minimum of ten encyclopedic volumes in length IMHO I would LOVE to see these stories in a continuing television soap operaThe Mahabharata basically consists of 200000 lines of poetry in Sanskrit It is a history of two competing families who are fighting over power like the English Plantagenet War of the Roses but on steroids The saga of the Kurus and the wars of generations between the Pandavas and the Kauravas cousin branches of the Kuru family is estimated to have taken place around 1000 bce there are still lots of arguments and it is very possible like Homer's poems the Mahabharata was slowly pulled together first by storytellers maybe before writing was invented One thing I AM certain of having read Homer some of the stories in the Iliad and in the Mahabharata seem the same except for names being changed Same hubris same lessons learned same messed up marriages same father son struggles for respectWith the spread of Hinduism in Asia many other Asian countries also know of and have adapted many stories from the Mahabharata Considering India alone is a nation of over a billion people to compare estimates of the population of European Union is a little over 511000000 the United States has about 328000000 people I am amazed the West mostly knows nothing about the Mahabharata Here is a link to the Wikipedia page on the Mahabharata is a Wikipedia link to the English War of Roses's book was recommended to me by Nandakishore Varma although I suspect he will not remember this It was years ago We are GR friends but we don't know each other I just got older growing deeper roots into my couch reading books and knitting lap robes in a senior living park while I think he has been living a real life unlike me since his profile picture shows a young or youngish man However I appreciate the time he took to recommend this book to me It must have been something I wrote which moved him to this recommendation but I have no idea what I wrote at this late date practically a decade has passed Goodreads didn't forget though and when I put in I was starting this book which I discovered on my shelves a couple of days ago thinking wtf what IS this? not remembering when or why I have it GR showed me recommended by Nandakishore Anyway As an American raised as a Christian born in a decade when America was racially 97% White and mostly Protestant and when there was no Internet or computers except huge mainframes two stories large which were programmed by punchcards and had light bulbs for circuitry kidding sort of I have been learning about other cultures late in life Thank you Nandakishore even if I yet am abysmally shallow in my surface understanding of Indian myths about cosmology and gods as well as of India's history culture and languages And even if you do not remember recommending Yugānta to me I certainly cannot speak about this obviously profound cultural saga with ANY intelligence ; p


  9. says:

    What a brilliant work of analysis Irawati Karve studies the key characters of the Mahabharata strips them of their mythical powers and presents them as ordinary humans struggling and grappling with issues that are as alive today as they were 3000 years back Pick of the lot for me was be the essay on Bhishma Spellbinding


  10. says:

    How did we accept the dreamy escapism of bhakti or blind hero worship after having faced and thought undauntingly of the hard realities of life? How did the people who used to eat all meats including beef find satisfaction in ritually drinking the urine and eating the dung of the cow and calling this uadruped their mother?It is irreverent It is frank and it is original Perhaps because it is from an era when political correctness had not seeped into our lives When being honest without malice was valued and respected I wonder if we will ever see such writing again But it is refreshing to say the leastShe has reviewed traditional heros like Bhishma and Karna and found them wanting She has followed relationships like that between Krishna and Arjun and found them to be of euals of intimate friends rather than the Deity Follower story that is so popular She has understood the women as real people and pointed out their failings with academic detailingBut most of all she makes us see the End of a Yuga Yuganta How we are used to looking at the past with the eyes of the present And how we get everything wrong because of that