SUMMARY · Fish in the Lakes, Wild Rice, and Game in Abundance: Testimony on Behalf of Mille Lacs Ojibwe Hunting and Fishing Rights

 Fish in the Lakes, Wild Rice, and Game in Abundance: Testimony on Behalf of Mille Lacs Ojibwe Hunting and Fishing Rights

READ Fish in the Lakes, Wild Rice, and Game in Abundance: Testimony on Behalf of Mille Lacs Ojibwe Hunting and Fishing Rights

Of the parties and the treaty's implementation The Mille Lacs Band faced a mammoth challenge How does one argue the Native side of the case when all historical documentation was written by non Natives The Mille Lacs selected six scholars to testify for them Published here for the first time Charles Cleland James McClurken Helen Tanner John.

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Nichols Thomas Lund and Bruce White discuss the circumstances under which the treaty was written the personalities involved in the negotiations and the legal rhetoric of the times as well as analyze related legal conflicts between Natives and non Natives Justice Sandra Day O'Connor delivered the 1999 Opinion of the United States Supreme Cou.

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On 13 August 1990 members of the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe filed a lawsuit against the State of Minnesota for interfering with the hunting fishing and gathering rights that had been guaranteed to them in an 1837 treaty with the United States In order to interpret the treaty the courts had to consider historical circumstances the intentions. God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater lawsuit against the State of Minnesota for interfering with the hunting fishing and gathering rights that had been guaranteed to them in an 1837 treaty with the United States In order to interpret the treaty the courts had to consider historical circumstances the intentions.


1 thoughts on “ Fish in the Lakes, Wild Rice, and Game in Abundance: Testimony on Behalf of Mille Lacs Ojibwe Hunting and Fishing Rights

  1. says:

    This book is an excellent history of treaty rights to natural resources between the Ojibway peoples and the State of Minnesota. There is a long history of misunderstanding and abuse of treaty rights by non indigenous (mostly white) people in Minnesota. Those of us who are not Ojibway are not aware of this long history, but the Ojibway are. This book greatly helped me understand why these issues are deep rooted and not easily resolved. I highly recommend this book to anyone working on treaty rights issues, regardless of the peoples involved and particular treaty.


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